Is there no longer a consensus in evangelicalism?

Though I honestly don’t necessarily agree with the tone of this article or have a strong opinion either way on whether churches should or should not be affirming in this way, because I don’t think that this is a dogmatic issue, I do fully agree with the fact that perhaps churches should start looking for ways to support a celibate vocation rather than simply finding a way around it.
Personally, I believe that there are many ways that Christians could go about addressing their homosexuality or same-sex attractions in a way that is right with God. I’m not advocating moral relativism, but I do think that God calls people to different things, whether that is celibacy, a celibate same-sex relationship, or whatever else He may call you to.
Main point: I am still fully supportive of lifelong celibacy as a legitimate calling from God, and I do wish that the church in general had more ministries and more support systems for people who have been called to that life. It’s tragic for me to see the church advocating celibacy while doing nothing to practically help people who are struggling with trying to figure out how to live that life.

Spiritual Friendship

Image from http://www.citychurchsf.org/Needs

Last week, City Church, a large evangelical church in San Francisco released this letter from its pastor and elders reflecting a shift in their position on same-sex sexual relationships. While they are not the first, nor will they be the last church to do so, their shift is particularly noteworthy because of the church’s original roots in the Presbyterian Church in America, a very conservative evangelical denomination, where it was planted in the model of Tim Keller’s Redeemer Church in New York City. All of this hits a bit close to home for me as an elder in a city church in the PCA.

What I found especially noteworthy were two points made in the letter justifying the shift—one biblical and one pastoral. The elders at City Church write,

For so long this has been a “case closed” kind of issue for evangelicals. But in recent years, multiple respected evangelical scholars and…

View original post 975 more words

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